Artist of Ambience: Aruba DeCuir

aruba-portrait

Artist of Ambience: Aruba DeCuir

by Netera Landar

In a French villa, surrounded by beautiful landscaping, Aruba DeCuir creates an eclectic environment, Chateau la Belette. A resident of Second Life® since March

2007, Aruba is an artist, furniture designer, and builder. Recently, her art gallery moved from a Caribbean town to Couronne, Flynn.

Her detailed, artistic vision begins on the exterior grounds. Twin narrow creeks flank the stone pathway that leads to the main gallery. Italian Cypress shade the path. Terracotta urns are topped with lavender. A lone flamingo dips his head into the water beside the reeds. Don’t mind the curious crow perched upon the stone sign pillar.

Stroll along the path toward the large open patio in front of the main building. Two lion sculptures stand on guard on mid-height pillars. Pumpkins add color to the season, and a small lantern guides. Bonsais grace the edges of the water.

The various buildings and rooms display her range of passion. The Antiques building heightens the period ambience with a table clad with a gold chalice, Victorian pitcher, Egyptian vessel, lion sculpture, and gothic candle holder. Shields on the walls lend a regal elegance. Her prices are very reasonable, her workmanship exceptional. The potted palm on a flower table with two chairs is a great deal. The French Louis XVI mirror would be great in a role-playing villa. How many places have a marble pillar and jade colored urn which are both reasonably priced?

The floral building has some realistic looking potted plants, including sweet meadow strawberries, and Hibiscus. They would be lovely in an SL greenhouse or on a terrace. If ‘God is in the details,’ Aruba has His ear!

“People were impressed when they saw my town of buildings. Last September, I decided to do something more European.

Center stage is the main hall. Bold red at the door greets with a Persian rug upon checkerboard patterned floor. Her first 2D creations are visible here; moody digital paintings in subdued hues, with touches of vibrancy. “Geronimo 2” contrasts cool tones with focal feathers. “Oak Leaves” offers a vine-like path across a blue pattern. All are accented by an Indian-inspired clay pot that rests on an antique marble fireplace mantel.

Turning to the left wing, upon the cocoa colored walls are digital collages contrasting nature with numbers. These are simple designs, great for modern decor.

The right wing introduces colorful paintings. “African Sunrise” warms with earth tones; golds, sea green, molten red. “The Lobster Quadrille,” playfully displays a pattern of lobsters, fishes, and crabs.

“The Red Sea” appears to follow the underwater schools, in stunning red and gold, with an image of Poseidon in the corner.

The far wing includes sensitive photographs of Paris, great for a cosmopolitan living room arrangement. Digital etchings in white, red, and gold, have an Egyptian or Asian feeling.

Her range of offerings can appeal to any taste!

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Eclectic Compositions by Eleanor Medier

Second Life® is an environment that promotes experimentation and variation. Artistically, this allows approaches to change like the weather. Yet, art with impact is strategic as well as inspirational. To make a strong, unique contribution to culture takes developing a vision and committing to it. The voice must be broad enough to stay creatively exciting, while at the same time, give the artist a recognizable identity.

Exemplifying a very wide range, Aruba works in series. Is there a vision common among them all? She shows a meticulous use of symbolic objects in close examination. As with her imported-from-real-life paintings, large icon-like images such as animals, letters, and patterns, begin a language viewers can learn to translate. Watching her image themes play through several media is part of the fun. It is a visual adventure from one to the next, providing combinations for contemplation.

The “Digital Etching” series, is best viewed individually. Each has a mystery, a riddle. “Digital Collage” prints seem like pages from a book. However, fresh and inviting, they are stronger viewed together.

Of Aruba’s moody photographs, XX has the anticipation of patrons soon to fill this corner. The antique setting speaks of quality, popularity, even tradition, while the chairs feel like a contemporary adaptation seeking to fit in.

Then there are Aruba’s Antiques! To create entire environments, both exterior and interior, shows her talents to their greatest potential. Few artists can carry a vision or a voice so far. She also demonstrates her command of creating historic personalities. Rich in detail, yet responsible in prims, Aruba imbues settings with grace and character. The buildings, gardens, and furnishings integrate into a setting that invites a cup of tea or a picnic. Artistically, she seems to think of everything, leaving no visual detail undeveloped.

An artist like Aruba begs for speculation on what she does best—i.e. better than others doing similar work. The huge range of her talents actually creates a complete environment—from landscape to architecture to interior. In each of these disciplines, she excels. In the end, what stands out is the overall impression more than its components—except that it tantalizes with ideas that beg further exploration. Aruba approaches her art with the details for the overall.

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To see the full issue as it is originally published with all photographs and graphics, please download Unforgettable #2. For more information, please contact Netera Landar, Editor-in-Chief, neteralandar.gmail.com.

See Issue #One for more features and profiles.

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